Чем отличается after effects от premiere pro
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Чем отличается after effects от premiere pro

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Importing from After Effects and Adobe Premiere Pro

You can import one After Effects project into another. Everything from the imported project—including footage items, compositions, and folders—appears inside a new folder in the current Project panel.

You can import an After Effects project from a different operating system, as long as you maintain the filenames, folder names, and either full or relative paths (folder locations) for all files in the project. To maintain relative paths, the source footage files must reside on the same volume as the project file. Use the File > Collect Files command to gather copies of all files in a project or composition into a single location. (See Cross-platform project considerations.)

Choose File > Import > File.
Select the After Effects project to import, and click Open.

If the operating system that you are using does not support a file format, if the file is missing, or if the reference link is broken, After Effects substitutes a placeholder item containing color bars. You can reconnect the placeholder to the appropriate file by double-clicking the entry in the Project panel and navigating to the source file. In most cases, you need to relink only one footage file. After Effects locates other missing items if they’re in the same location.

When you render a movie and export it to the QuickTime (MOV), Video for Windows (AVI) format, you can embed a link to the project in the container file. To import the project, import the MOV or AVI file, and choose Project from the Import As menu in the Import File dialog box. If the file contains a link to a project that has been moved, you can browse to locate the project..

Import an Adobe Premiere Pro project

Importing an Adobe Premiere Pro project into After Effects does not use Dynamic Link. After Effects can’t import a Premiere Pro project if one or more sequences in it are already dynamically linked to After Effects. (See Working with Adobe Premiere Pro and After Effects.)

When you import an Adobe Premiere Pro project, After Effects imports it into the Project panel as both a new composition containing each Adobe Premiere Pro clip as a layer, and as a folder containing each clip as an individual footage item. If your Adobe Premiere Pro project contains bins, After Effects converts them to folders within the Adobe Premiere Pro project folder. After Effects converts nested sequences to nested compositions.

Not all features of an Adobe Premiere Pro project are preserved when the project is imported into After Effects. The same features are preserved when you import a Premiere Pro project into After Effects as when you copy and paste between Premiere Pro and After Effects. (See Importing from After Effects and Adobe Premiere Pro.)

After Effects preserves the order of clips in the timeline, the footage duration (including all trimmed In and Out points), and marker and transition locations. After Effects bases the arrangement of layers in the Timeline panel on the arrangement of clips in the Adobe Premiere Pro Timeline panel. After Effects adds Adobe Premiere Pro clips to the Timeline panel as layers in the order in which they appeared—from the bottom up and from left to right—in the Adobe Premiere Pro Timeline panel. After Effects preserves changes made to the speed of a clip, for example, with the Clip > Speed command, and these changes appear as a value in the Stretch column in the After Effects Timeline panel.

After Effects imports effects common to Adobe Premiere Pro and After Effects, and preserves keyframes for these effects.

Transitions and titles (except for dissolves) included in your Adobe Premiere Pro project appear in the After Effects composition as solid layers with their original location and duration.

Audio Level keyframes are preserved.

After Effects and Photoshop

Get the most out of your post-production editing in Premiere Pro by using various other Adobe applications, like After Effects, and Photoshop.

You can use various other Adobe applications to enhance or modify the assets used in a Premiere Pro project. Also, you can use Premiere Pro to edit projects begun in other applications.

Edit a clip in its original application

In Premiere Pro, the Edit Original command opens clips in the applications associated with their file types. You can edit clips in the associated applications. Premiere Pro automatically incorporates the changes into the current project without replacing files. Similarly, Premiere Pro sequences placed in other applications, such as Adobe After Effects can be opened with the host product’s Edit Original command.

Select a clip in either the Project panel or Timeline panel.
Choose Edit > Edit Original.

You can export a movie from Premiere Pro with the data necessary for the Edit Original command. In the Export Movie Settings dialog box, choose Project from the Embedding options menu.

Copy between After Effects and Premiere Pro

  • From the After Effects Timeline panel, you can copy layers based on audio or video footage items (including solids) and paste them into the Adobe Premiere Pro Timeline panel.
  • From the Adobe Premiere Pro Timeline panel, you can copy assets (any items in a track) and paste them into the After Effects Timeline panel.
  • From either After Effects or Adobe Premiere Pro , you can copy and paste footage items to the other’s Project panel. note: You can’t, however, paste footage items from the After Effects Project panel into the Adobe Premiere Pro Timeline panel.

If you want to work with all clips or a single sequence from an Adobe Premiere Pro project, use the Import command instead to import the project into After Effects .

Use Adobe Dynamic Link to create dynamic links, without rendering, between new or existing compositions in After Effects and Adobe Premiere Pro . For more information, see Adobe Dynamic Link.

Copy from After Effects to Adobe Premiere Pro

You can copy a layer based on a footage item from an After Effects composition and paste it into an Adobe Premiere Pro sequence. Adobe Premiere Pro converts these layers to clips in the sequence and copies the source footage item to its Project panel. If the layer contains an effect that is also used by Adobe Premiere Pro , Adobe Premiere Pro converts the effect and all of its settings and keyframes.

You can also copy nested compositions, Photoshop layers, solid-color layers, and audio layers. Adobe Premiere Pro converts nested compositions to nested sequences, and solid-color layers to color mattes. You cannot copy shape, text, camera, light, or adjustment layers to Adobe Premiere Pro .

Start Adobe Premiere Pro (you must start Adobe Premiere Pro before you copy the layer in After Effects ).

Select a layer (or layers) from the After Effects Timeline panel.

If you select multiple layers and the layers don’t overlap in After Effects , they’re placed on the same track in Adobe Premiere Pro . On the other hand, if the layers overlap in After Effects, the order in which you select them determines the order of their track placement in Adobe Premiere Pro . Each layer is placed on a separate track, and the last selected layer appears on Track 1. For example, if you select layers from top to bottom, the layers appear in the reverse order in Adobe Premiere Pro , with the bottom-most layer on Track 1.

Choose Edit > Copy.
In Adobe Premiere Pro , open a sequence in the Timeline panel.

Move the current-time indicator to the desired location, and choose either Edit > Paste or Edit > Paste Insert.

Results of pasting into Premiere Pro

When you paste a layer into an Adobe Premiere Pro sequence, keyframes, effects, and other properties in the copied layer are converted as follows:

After Effects item

Converted to in Adobe Premiere Pro

Audio volume property

Channel Volume filter

Blending modes supported by Adobe Premiere Pro are converted

Effect properties and keyframes

Effect properties and keyframes, if the effect also exists in Adobe Premiere Pro

Adobe Premiere Pro lists unsupported effects as offline in the Effect Controls panel. Some After Effects effects have the same names as those in Adobe Premiere Pro , but since they’re actually different effects, they aren’t converted.

Masks and mattes

Stereo Mixer effect

Channel Volume filter

Time Remap property

Time Remapping effect

Time Stretch property

Speed and time stretch have an inverse relationship. For example, 200% stretch in After Effects converts to 50% speed in Adobe Premiere Pro .

Transform property values and keyframes

Motion or Opacity values and keyframes

The keyframe type—Bezier, Auto Bezier, Continuous Bezier, or Hold—is retained.

Source settings for R3D source files

Source settings for R3D source files

Copy from Adobe Premiere Pro to After Effects

You can copy a video or audio asset from an Adobe Premiere Pro sequence and paste it into an After Effects composition. After Effects converts assets to layers and copies the source footage items into its Project panel. If the asset contains an effect that is also used by After Effects , After Effects converts the effect and all of its settings and keyframes.

You can copy color mattes, stills, nested sequences, and offline files, too. After Effects converts color mattes into solid-color layers and converts nested sequences into nested compositions. When you copy a Photoshop still image into After Effects , After Effects retains the Photoshop layer information. You cannot paste Adobe Premiere Pro titles into After Effects , but you can paste text with attributes from the Adobe Premiere Titler into After Effects .

Select an asset from the Adobe Premiere Pro Timeline panel.
Choose Edit > Copy .
In After Effects , open a composition in the Timeline panel.

With the Timeline panel active, choose Edit > Paste . The asset appears as the topmost layer in the Timeline panel.

To paste the asset at the current-time indicator, place the current-time indicator and press Ctrl+Alt+V (Windows) or Command+Option+V (Mac OS).

Results of pasting into After Effects

When you paste an asset into an After Effects composition, keyframes, effects, and other properties in a copied asset are converted as follows:

Adobe Premiere Pro asset

Converted to in After Effects

Audio tracks that are either 5.1 surround or greater than 16‑bit aren’t supported. Mono and stereo audio tracks are imported as one or two layers.

Time Remap property

Motion or Opacity values and keyframes

Transform property values and keyframes

Keyframe type—Bezier, Auto Bezier, Continuous Bezier, or Hold—is retained.

Markers on a new solid-color layer

To copy sequence markers, you must either copy the sequence itself or import the entire Adobe Premiere Pro project as a composition.

Time Stretch property

Speed and time stretch have an inverse relationship. For example, 50% speed in Adobe Premiere Pro is converted to 200% stretch in After Effects .

Time Remapping effect

Time Remap property

Universal counting leaders

Video and audio transitions

Opacity keyframes (Cross dissolve only) or solid-color layers

Video effect properties and keyframes

Effect properties and keyframes, if the effect also exists in After Effects

After Effects doesn’t display unsupported effects in the Effect Controls panel.

Volume and Channel Volume audio filters

Stereo mixer effect

Other audio filters are not converted.

Source settings for R3D source files

Source settings for R3D source files

When you import a Premiere Pro project into After Effects , features are converted in the same manner as they are converted when copying from Premiere Pro to After Effects .

Work with Photoshop and Premiere Pro

If you use Photoshop to create still images, you can use Premiere Pro to make them move and change. You can animate an entire image or any of its layers.

You can edit individual frames of video and image sequence files in Photoshop. In addition to using any Photoshop tool to edit and paint on video, you can also apply filters, masks, transformations, layers styles, and blending modes. You can paint using the Clone Stamp, Pattern Stamp, Healing Brush, or Spot Healing Brush. You can also edit video frames using the Patch tool.

In Photoshop, with the Clone Stamp, you can sample a frame from a video layer and paint with the sampled source onto another video frame. As you move to different target frames, the source frame changes relative to the frame from which you initially sampled.

After making edits, you can save the video as a PSD file, or you can render it as a QuickTime movie or image sequence. You can import any of these back into Premiere Pro for further editing.

If you use Premiere Pro to create movies, you can use Photoshop to refine the individual frames of those movies. In Photoshop, you can do any of the following:

  • Remove unwanted visual elements.
  • Draw on individual frames.
  • Use the superior selection and masking tools to divide a frame into elements for animation or compositing.

Comparative advantages for specific tasks

The strengths of Premiere Pro lie in its numerous video editing features. You can use it to combine Photoshop files with video clips, audio clips, and other assets. You can use the Photoshop files, for example, as titles, graphics, and masks.

In contrast, Photoshop has excellent tools for painting, drawing, and selecting portions of an image. The Photoshop Quick Selection tool and Magnetic Lasso tool make it easy to create a mask from a complex shape. Rather than hand-drawing a mask in Premiere Pro, consider doing this work in Photoshop. Similarly, if you are applying several paint strokes by hand to get rid of dust, consider using the Photoshop paint tools.

The animation and video features in Photoshop Extended include simple keyframe-based animation. Premiere Pro, however, provides quite a bit more keyframe control over various properties.

Premiere Pro can import and export still images in many formats. For greatest versatility, however, use the native Photoshop PSD format when transferring individual frames or still image sequences from Photoshop to Premiere Pro.

When you import a PSD file into Premiere Pro, you can choose whether to import it as a flattened image, or with its layers separate and intact.

It is often a good idea to prepare a still image in Photoshop before importing it into Premiere Pro. Examples of such preparation include correcting color, scaling, and cropping. It is often better to change a source image in Photoshop than to have Premiere Pro perform the same operation many times per second as it renders each frame for previews or final output.

In Photoshop, you can create a PSD document that is set up correctly for a specific video output type. From the New File dialog box, select a Film & Video preset. In Premiere Pro, you can create a PSD document that matches your composition and sequence settings. Choose File > New > Photoshop File.

You can no longer exchange PSD video files with Photoshop, however, you can render a movie directly from Photoshop and then import it back into Premiere Pro. For example, you can create a QuickTime movie from Photoshop that can then be imported into Premiere Pro.

Premiere Pro works internally with colors in an RGB (red, green, blue) color space. If you want to edit video clips you create in Photoshop in Premiere Pro, create the clips in RGB.

If you want to broadcast the final movie it is best to ensure, in Photoshop, that the colors in your image are broadcast-safe. Assign the appropriate destination color space—for example, SDTV (Rec. 601)—to the document in Photoshop.

Premiere Pro can import and export still images in many formats. For greatest versatility, however, use the native Photoshop PSD format when transferring individual frames or still image sequences from Photoshop to Premiere Pro.

When you import a PSD file into Premiere Pro, you can choose whether to import it as a flattened image, or with its layers separate and intact.

It is often a good idea to prepare a still image in Photoshop before importing it into Premiere Pro. Examples of such preparation include correcting color, scaling, and cropping. It is often better to change a source image in Photoshop than to have Premiere Pro perform the same operation many times per second as it renders each frame for previews or final output.

In Photoshop, you can create a PSD document that is set up correctly for a specific video output type. From the New File dialog box, select a Film & Video preset. In Premiere Pro, you can create a PSD document that matches your composition and sequence settings. Choose File > New > Photoshop File.

Create and edit Photoshop files

You can create a still Photoshop file that automatically inherits the pixel and frame aspect ratio settings of your Premiere Pro project. You can also edit any still image file in a Premiere Pro project in Photoshop.

Create a Photoshop file in a project

Choose File > New > Photoshop File .

Photoshop opens with a new blank still image. The pixel dimensions match the project’s video frame size, and image guides show the title-safe and action-safe areas for the project.

Edit a still image file in Photoshop

From within a project, you can open an image file in most formats that Adobe Photoshop supports. Premiere Pro does not import files in CMYK or LAB color formats.

Select a still-image clip in either the Project panel or Timeline panel .
Choose Edit > Edit In Adobe Photoshop .

The file opens in Photoshop. When you save the file, changes are available in the Premiere Pro project.

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  • Exporting projects for other applications

Types of effects in Premiere Pro

Explore the variety of audio and video effects that Premiere Pro offers. Also learn how to find and organize effects in the Effects panel.

Premiere Pro includes various audio and video effects that you can apply to clips in your video program. An effect can add a special visual or audio characteristic or provide an unusual feature attribute. For example, an effect can alter the exposure or color of footage, manipulate sound, distort images, or add artistic effects. You can also use effects to rotate and animate a clip or adjust its size and position within the frame. You control the intensity of an effect by the values that you set for it. You can also animate the controls for most effects using keyframes in the Effect Controls panel or in a Timeline panel.

You can create and apply presets for all effects. You can animate effects using keyframes and view information about individual keyframes directly in a Timeline panel.

Types of effects

Premiere Pro has many in-built effects. Some are fixed effects (effects that are pre-applied or built-in). Some are standard effects that you apply to a clip. Effects can also be clip-based (applied to a clip), or track-based (applied to a track). You can also use effects created by external manufacturers that you can use as a plug-in in Premiere Pro.

  • Fixed effects
  • Standard effects
  • Clip-based or track-based effects
  • Effect plug-ins

Effects in Premiere Pro are also grouped into the following categories for better searchability. Three buttons appear under the search field toward the upper left of the Effects panel. These buttons act as filters for three types of effects:

  • GPU-Accelerated effects
  • 32-bit Color effects
  • YUV effects

When you toggle one of these buttons on, only effects and transitions of its type are shown in the list of effects below. You can toggle one or more of these buttons to filter the list of effects for any combination of attributes.

Read on for more information on all the different types of effects.

Fixed effects

Every clip you add to a Timeline panel has Fixed effects pre-applied, or built in. Fixed effects control the inherent properties of a clip and appear in the Effect Controls panel whenever the clip is selected. You can adjust all of the Fixed effects in the Effect Controls panel. However, the Program Monitor, Timeline panel, and Audio Mixer also provide controls that are often easier to use. The Fixed effects include the following:

Motion

Includes properties that allow you to animate, rotate, and scale your clips, adjust their anti-flicker property, or composite them with other clips. (To adjust the Motion effect in the Program Monitor, see Adjust position, scale, and rotation and Animate motion in the Program Monitor.)

Opacity

Lets you reduce the opacity of a clip for use in such effects as overlays, fades, and dissolves.

Time Remapping

Lets you slow down, speed up, or reverse playback, or freeze a frame, for any part of a clip. Provides fine control for the acceleration or deceleration of these changes.

Volume

Because Fixed effects are already built in to each clip, you need only adjust their properties to activate them.

Premiere Pro renders Fixed effects after any Standard effects that are applied to the clip. Standard effects are rendered in the order in which they appear, from the top down. You can change the order of Standard effects by dragging them to a new position in the Effect Controls panel, but you can’t reorder Fixed effects.

If you want to change the render order of Fixed effects, use Standard effects instead. Use the Transform effect in place of the Motion effect. Use the Alpha Adjust effect in place of the Opacity effect, and the Volume effect in place of the fixed Volume effect. While these effects are not identical to the Fixed effects, their properties are equivalent.

Standard effects

Standard effects are additional effects that you must first apply to a clip to create a desired result. You can apply any number or combination of Standard effects to any clip in a sequence. Use Standard effects to add special characteristics or to edit your video, such as adjusting tone or trimming pixels. Premiere Pro includes many video and audio effects, which are located in the Effects panel. Standard effects must be applied to a clip and then adjusted in the Effect Controls panel. Certain video effects allow direct manipulation using handles in the Program Monitor. All Standard effect properties can be animated over time using keyframing and changing the shape of the graphs in the Effect Controls panel. The smoothness or speed of the effect animation can be fine-tuned by adjusting the shape of Bezier curves in the Effect Controls panel.

The effects listed in the Effects panel depend on the actual effect files in the language subfolder of the Premiere Pro Plug-ins folder. You can expand the repertoire of effects by adding compatible Adobe plug-in files or plug-in packages available through other third-party developers.

Clip-based and track-based effects

All video effects—both Fixed and Standard effects—are clip-based. They alter individual clips. You can apply a clip-based effect to more than one clip at a time by creating a nested sequence.

Audio effects can be applied to either clips or to tracks. To apply track-based effects, use the Audio Mixer. If you add keyframes to the effect, you can then adjust the effect either in the Audio Mixer or a Timeline panel.

Effect plug-ins

In addition to the dozens of effects included with Premiere Pro, many effects are available in the form of plug-ins. You can purchase plug-ins from Adobe or third-party vendors, or acquire from other compatible applications. For example, many Adobe After Effects plug-ins and VST plug-ins can be used in Premiere Pro. However, Adobe officially supports only plug-ins that are installed with the application.

Any effect is available to Premiere Pro when its plug-in file is present in the common Plug-ins folder:

  • (Windows) Program Files\Adobe\Common\Plug-ins\\MediaCore
  • (Mac OS) /Library/Application Support/Adobe/Common/Plug-ins//MediaCore

Using the installer for a plug-in is the best way to make sure the plug-in and its related files are installed in the right place.

When you open a project with references to missing effects, Premiere Pro does the following:

  • tells you which effects are missing
  • marks the effects as offline
  • performs any rendering without the effects

For a current list of third-party plug-ins, see the Adobe website.

To edit a project containing add-on plug-ins on more than one computer, install the plug-ins on all the computers.

GPU-Accelerated effects

Here is a list of GPU accelerated effects available in Adobe Premiere Pro. For these effects, playback would be in real time and doesn’t require rendering.

Some effects can take advantage of the processing power of the GPU to accelerate rendering.

See Premiere Pro system requirements for information on supported GPUs (graphics cards).

On Mac OS, CUDA acceleration features require Mac OS X v10.6.3 or later.

Acceleration is available for an accelerated effect only when a supported video card is installed. If a supported video card is not installed, the Accelerated Effects filter button still functions. The Accelerated Effects badge is shown in a disabled state to indicate that acceleration is not available.

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